Flowering Bushes · Flowers · Gardening · Roses

The Transformation of Our Roses From Little Shrubs to Blooming Beauties.

Othello rose - one of the first roses I started to grow in our garden in 2015.
Othello rose – one of the first roses I started to grow in our garden in 2015.

Today I would like to show you how roses can transform from little shrubs to much bigger, beautiful and abundantly blooming plants. As princesses and queens of the gardens they usually require more tender care than other perennials.

I will feature here 2 of our roses and right now we have it total 11 roses in our garden and 10 varieties. I have written about roses in the past and I will add links to them under this post.

Othello Rose

I have purchased it in June 2015, about 2,5 years ago, along with the Memorial Day rose, you can see beside it on the right. Both of them were already blooming, but at this time were pretty small. Here I am just trying out how they will look beside each other and deciding if it is the right spot for them. In fact they were both planted right there.  In a moment you will be able to see how much they have grown and changed from this day and their transformation from just a small shrubs to big, mature plants.

Two of my first roses - Othello and Memorial Day, waiting to be planted while I am preparing a space for them.
Two of my first roses – Othello and Memorial Day, waiting to be planted while I am preparing a space for them.

Here is Othello rose 2 years later, in June 2017.  You can see how much it has grown and it would have been much bigger if I wouldn’t trim it each year.

Othello rose blooming abundantly in our garden, June 2017. It works quite well in a composition with perennial geraniums, creeping thyme and lavenders.
Othello rose blooming abundantly in our garden, June 2017. It works quite well in a composition with perennial geraniums, creeping thyme and lavenders.

Othello Rose was hybridized by David Austin, 1986, so more than 30 years ago. It has beautiful, very full, rounded shape, dark pink colour and strong, Damascus rose scent.  This year it was one of the best blooming roses in our garden and it still had many blooms when I was wrapping it in burlap to protect it from winter.

Close up of our Othello rose, in the last week of June, 2017.
Close up of our Othello rose, in the last week of June, 2017.

 

Here you can see well the details of Othello rose flower. I think its shape and the way petals are arranged is really beautiful.
Here you can see well the details of Othello rose flower. I think its shape and the way petals are arranged is really beautiful.

Memorial Day Rose

This rose, hybridized by Tom Carruth, 2001, has also some other, perhaps more suitable and nicer names – “Millie Rose” (Thousands of Roses) and “Parfum de Liberte” (The Scent of Freedom).

As I have already mentioned, I have purchased our Memorial Day rose at the same time as Othello rose. Beside smaller Abbotsford rose, it is the best blooming and one of the biggest roses in our garden. For the second year, I have given it the title of the Queen of our garden. I think it well deserves it because of its beauty, as well as height, almost continues bloom, abundance and size of the flowers and a beautiful scent.  I have already showed you in one of the pictures above how it looked when I have purchased it. Here it is soon after I have planted it in the Summer of 2015.

The beginning of our first flower bed with Memorial Day and Othello roses, as well as lemon balm and some wild flowers in the back, 2015.
The beginning of our first flower bed with Memorial Day rose, as well as lemon balm and some wild flowers in the back, 2015.

It kept growing much bigger and taller in the following year and continued to bloom very abundantly almost all the time during the warmer part of the year from the beginning of June till I had to wrap it in burlap before winter, usually around the middle of November.

In the picture below you can see it as it looked in October of 2016, so more than a year later since I have introduced it to our garden. Isn’t it a huge transformation? See how big is has grown and notice the enormous size of its blooms. Isn’t it amazing?

A close up of our Memorial Day rose, October 19, 2016.
A close up of our Memorial Day rose, October 19, 2016. Lavender – Lavandula angustifolia blooms in front of it on the right.

Here is our Memorial Day rose in July 2017, about 9 months later since the previous picture visible above was taken. I have cut this rose a bit in the meantime because it was getting too big.

Memorial Day rose in our garden at the beginning of July, 2017.
Memorial Day rose in our garden at the beginning of July, 2017.

Even despite a lot of rain and very little sunshine we had here this summer, and being neglected by me for two months when I was away, Memorial Day rose was blooming beautifully in September of this year, 2017. It continued to bloom when I was wrapping it in burlap around the middle of November of this year.

Here in the picture below it looks a bit beaten up because of the bad weather we had this Spring and Summer. As a result of it, and perhaps because of the neglect due to my long absence, it  got some black spot and I had to remove many of its leaves. Nevertheless, it continued to bloom and to be one of the biggest roses in our garden. To find our more about Memorial Day rose, you might also like to read my other article about it here.

Memorial Day rose in our garden September, 2017, after it was neglected for about 2 months while I was away.
Memorial Day rose in our garden September, 2017, after it was neglected for about 2 months while I was away.

To learn how I protect our roses from winter you can read this article.

To discover what roses we have  in our garden and see more of their pictures, please follow the links to part one and part two of my articles about them.

A Close-up of Memorial Day rose in our garden, July 2017.
A Close-up of Memorial Day rose in our garden, July 2017.

Please Comment on this Blog.

Have you ever seen big transformation of some of your plants in the garden? Have they grown nicely or perhaps just died?  Were they perennials or annuals? What was your big surprise in the garden, a plant that has positively amazed you with its transformation? Please share your experience with us. Thank you.

Following and Sharing this Blog.

If you like this article, please share it with other people who might be inserted in reading it as well.  Thank you. I  encourage you to follow or subscribe to this blog to receive automatic updates, so you won’t miss future posts.  I look forward to your comments.

The Copyright.

All photographs and this article are copyrighted by me, Renata Ratajczyk unless otherwise mentioned. I you would like to use any of them in your publications or on your website, please contact me.

Weekly Challenge – “Transformation”.

This article is shared as part of the Weekly Photo Challenge: Transformation.

Other Articles You Might Also Like to Read.

  1. Roses Blooming in our garden – Part 1.
  2. Roses Blooming in our garden – Part 2.
  3. How to Prepare Roses for Winter.
  4. Memorial Day Rose.
  5. Growing Eden Climbing Rose.
  6. Plants Which Can Thrive on Neglect – Part 1.
  7. Visiting My Friend’s Garden in Poland – don’t be afraid of mixing up different colours.
  8. Black Beauty lily.
  9. Visiting Niagara Park’s Botanical Gardens, Part 1.
  10. Visiting Niagara Park’s Botanical Gardens, Part 2.
  11. A Beautiful Italian Garden For You to Visit – “Giardino Sigurtà” in Valeggio sul Mincio, Northern Italy.

 

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7 thoughts on “The Transformation of Our Roses From Little Shrubs to Blooming Beauties.

    1. Thank you very much Anita for your comment and I am very happy to hear you like my roses. Also thank you for recommending Pierre de Ronsard rose. Indeed it is very beautiful. I will try to get it as well if I can find it in my area. I think it looks a bit similar to Eden rose, which I already have and you can see it here: http://bit.ly/2pq6hcL By the way you have a great blog.

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      1. Yes you are right it does look very similar! What a great rose! Your dahlias are also looking amazing. Do you keep them in the ground all year round?

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      2. Thank you. Eden rose is indeed very beautiful. For now it was only blooming in our garden in June and July and it had a couple of flowers in September. It is supposed to be a repeat bloomer, but maybe it needs more time (it is only its second year in our garden). Besides this year was very wet and not the best for roses.

        I wonder if the rose you have recommended – Pierre de Ronsard is a repeat bloomer and how it performs in your garden? Also thank you for your kind words about our dahlias. We are in the Greater Toronto Area – zone 5b, so I have to take them out before it gets too cold. I store dahlias for winter and restart them at home around the middle or end of April. Then I plant them back around the end of May when the danger of frost has passed. Once dahlias start blooming, they keep going till the frost. They are indeed amazing flowers. I wish they would be more hardy in our zone, but still they are well worth the effort to keep them alive for the next season.

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